How Do I Get To France // Step 1

Today I’m going to share my experiences in pursuing my Master Degree. As usual, I worked as a Marketing lecturer in my undergraduate university (I don’t know whether I am able to mention brands here on blog, so I’ll just refer it to PCU from now on). At PCU, lecturers who hold only undergraduate academic titles should be taking master study soon, following the urgency of the Ministry of High Education (called DIKTI in Indonesia).  And so the journey began…

Step 1 // Applying to MSM UNAIR

I was told by my Head of Program that my application to pursue Master degree was approved, dated approximately somewhere in May or June 2011 ago. I couldn’t be happier, that small talks made my day. I rushed to my desk to clarify my options, see if I can apply for the next closest intake in September 2011. There were two options at the moment, I gotta choose between UI or Unair.  Then I found out that UI has closed for the intake, left me only the Unair option. The next week, I talked to my Dean and Vice Dean about those two options and got supported to go to UI. I really wish to study at a more practical/applied master study rather than a scientific one. We ended up with me choosing the scientific study at Unair, called Master Science Management (MSM). I gotta be honest that this is not my first option at the time. I wish I could go to either UI or the Applied Management (called Magister Management) of Unair. Well, considering my background as a lecturer, I have to take the MSM at Unair.

I applied there, finish all the tests and requirements, and ready for the study. I remembered one thing vividly about studying there. I was offered the Double Degree Program of Indonesia-France (DDIP) by the administrative staff there; her name was Riska (thanks to you Mbak Riska, if you read this). For the next few days I still considered this offer as a heavy challenge to finish my master study. Now that I am here in France, I understand completely that this was a miracle. God has a plan when He put me to study at MSM Unair. I remembered clearly that this is my last option if any others failed me, and God was there, made this unbelievably less-considered option a miracle to me.

Eguilles…’une belle région d’aix en provence’

 

Today we’re going to my friend’s house in Eguilles, Aix en Provence to do the homework of Prof Chandon, one of our lecturer of Data Analysis in IAE, site Puyricard. We looked around, and there are so many ‘big and beautiful’ houses or appartment on our way there. Kinda like a good neighbourhood with a little more modern architecture. And Mohua, our friend, cooked us this chinese meal, so delicious, and in ‘small portion’, so I believe one two person still hungry :)…anyway, we ended up finishing the case 4 for the next meeting in the class, but we promise to meet together again in another’s house, maybe in Phan Anh appartment, one of our friend also in the group. The good thing about our group is, we’re like this ‘omnivora’, so we can taste different cuisine, from different countries, and different cultures….it’s good to have a friend who likes to share…

 

By ferryjaolis

iPhone 4S’ Siri…(source: Mike Elgan; Cult of Mac)

What’s So Great About Siri?

By Mike Elgan (8:32 am, Oct. 08, 2011)

What’s So Great About Siri?

Apple announced speech recognition for the next iPhone. Big deal. Android’s had it for more than a year. Apple is just playing “catch-up” and the feature’s not really earth-shattering anyway. Right?

Wrong. Everything in that opening paragraph is wrong, except the sentence that reads “big deal.” Siri is a very big deal, the biggest of deals.

In fact, Siri is the most important thing to happen to mobile in this decade so far.

Siri naysayers fall into two camps: 1) those who say it’s no big deal; and 2) those who say Android has had it since August. Both classes of naysayers are wrong.

Siri is a Very Big Deal

As I detailed in this Cult of Mac post, Siri traces its lineage directly back to the largest artificial intelligence project in history, the Pentagon’s CALO project. CALO stands for “Cognitive Assistant that Learns and Organizes,” and the project involved over 300 of the world’s top researchers in various aspects of A.I.

The entire Pentagon project was headed by Adam Cheyer, who is now director of engineering for Apple’s iPhone group.

Speaking to MIT Technology Review, Cheyer said that CALO sought to integrate “dialog and natural-language understanding, vision, speech, machine learning, planning, reasoning, service delegation and integrate them all into a… human-like assistant that can help you get things done.”

He described the Siri project as seeking to do the same thing in a consumer product. In fact, for the past four years, Cheyer and his team have been focused on optimizing the parts of CALO technology that can execute from a powerful cell phone and be usable by millions of everyday consumers. For the past year and a half, they’ve been working hard to integrate Siri technology into the iPhone OS and application set.

It’s not “voice recognition.” It’s artificial intelligence. And A.I. in your cell phone is a very big deal.

Siri Is Not Like Android Voice Actions

Android Voice Actions is great technology, and is widely used by many Android fans. But it’s not really in the same class as Siri.

Android Voice Actions offers a very solid and capable voice recognition engine that’s on the high-quality end of the spectrum among the wide range of similar products and services that have been around for awhile.

Like all existing voice-command and dictation products, it requires you to say a relatively narrow range of commands or it won’t understand you.

Siri, on the other hand, will be unlike anything the public has used before. You can say things that technically or literally have nothing to do with what you mean, but Siri will in many cases figure out what you mean based on context, history and and artificial intelligence designed to understand regular human speech.

For example, if you want to set an alarm for your nap, just say “wake me up in 20 minutes.” If you want to know what meetings you have scheduled for later, you can say, “how does the rest of my day look?”

These inputs specifically reference neither the application to be used nor the information desired. Yet Siri understands.

As humans, we take the understanding of such comments for granted. But getting machines to understand such tricky phrases is the Holy Grail of artificial intelligence.

Even more human-like is that once you’ve got a conversation started with Siri, it can understand requests that are even more cryptic. For example, you might ask: “Are there any top-rated Italian restaurants within walking distance?” If Siri replies, “no,” you can say, “how about Mexican?” Siri interprets your input in the context of a conversation about top-rated restaurants within walking distance.

Android Voice Actions can’t do anything like this because it’s voice command software, not artificial intelligence.

Siri sometimes gives you web search results, sometimes takes actions for you and sometimes controls the applications on your iPhone.

But Siri also answers questions, thanks to Wolfram-Alpha integration. You can ask random questions like “how many kilometers in 30 miles?,” “What time is it in Paris?,” “how many octaves on a piano,” or “why is the sky blue?” and Siri will just give you the answer. Not a web page. An answer to your question.

What’s the Greatest Great Thing About Siri

But the greatest thing about Siri from a historical and cultural perspective is not that it’s artificial intelligence. It’s that Apple via Siri will make A.I. a mainstream, everyday reality.

The reason is that Apple is baked Siri right into the core experience of using the iPhone. And also Siri is designed for mainstream, everyday use in a way that just about everyone will find compelling.

By mainstreaming, I mean the process of taking something that’s on the fringe of human culture, and making it an everyday part of life for a vast number of people. Right now, Google Voice Action is on the fringe of culture. The average personal on the street never heard of it.

Siri will become mainstream. Just about everyone will become familiar with it, even if they’re not iPhone users.

Edison didn’t invent the lightbulb. He mainstreamed it through product design and marketing.

Ford didn’t invent the automobile. He mainstreamed it through cost reductions and marketing.

We remember the mainstreamers because these are the people and companies that put technologies into every day use for everybody. And we can trace all current lightbulbs and cars back to Edison and Ford.

Google Voice Actions isn’t artificial intelligence. But it is an effective way for users to use voice to do things they would otherwise have to do with typing and touching and navigating through a visual interface.

However, the Android tool isn’t taking voice command mainstream. A lot of power users use it. But your mom will use Siri.

And One More Thing

iPhone 4s may be the first-ever phone to support Bluetooth 4.0, an ultra low-power technology that does a neat trick: It can wake devices up.

Combine this wireless capability with Siri, and you’ve got some interesting uses. For example, you can imagine a super long battery life wristwatch that stays asleep unless you touch it for the time, or when Siri wakes it up with some incoming information. And, of course, you’d talk to Siri by talking to the watch, while the phone is in your phone or purse.

You could also imagine a special-purpose desktop microphone that wakes up your iPhone when you talk, enabling a Star Trek experience of just talking without pushing a button, and getting responses back from the Enterprise’s, I mean iPhone’s, A.I.

So let’s be very clear about what Siri means for the human race. Siri represents the dawn of a new era in human-machine interfacing, real artificial intelligence for the masses.

No, it’s not perfect. Apple took the rare step of calling it “beta.” And no, it’s not the super advanced kind of A.I. you see in science fiction.

But it’s also not finished. The iPhone 4s’s Siri is just the beginning. Future versions will become ever more sophisticated.

Google, Microsoft and others will come out with their own A.I (in that order, I predict).

So when you get the chance to finally talk to Siri, be nice. Siri is a very, very big deal, and unlike anything that has come before. It represents a new era in computing. And it will definitely get everyone talking.

By ferryjaolis

Goodbye Mr. Jobs…(source: ABC News)

Steve Jobs dies: Apple chief created personal computer, iPad, iPod, iPhone

Steve Jobs, the mastermind behind Apple’s iPhone, iPad, iPod, iMac and iTunes, has died, Apple said. Jobs was 56.

ABC News – 8 mins ago

  • FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2008, file photo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new MacBook Air after giving the keynote address at the Apple MacWorld Conference in San Francisco. Apple on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011 said Jobs has died. He was 56. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)Jeff Chiu, File – FILE – In this Jan. 15, 2008, file photo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new MacBook Air after giving the keynote address at the Apple MacWorld Conference in San Francisco. Apple on Wednesday, …moreBy NED POTTER and COLLEEN CURRY
Steve Jobs, the mastermind behind Apple’s iPhone, iPad, iPod, iMac and iTunes, has died, Apple said. Jobs was 56.”We are deeply saddened to announce that Steve Jobs passed away today,” read a statement by Apple’s board of directors. “Steve’s brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives. The world is immeasurably better because of Steve. His greatest love was for his wife, Laurene, and his family. Our hearts go out to them and to all who were touched by his extraordinary gifts.”

The homepage of Apple’s website this evening switched to a full-page image of Jobs with the text, “Steve Jobs 1955-2011.”

Clicking on the image revealed the additional text: “Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being. Those of us who have been fortunate enough to know and work with Steve have lost a dear friend and an inspiring mentor. Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple.”

Jobs co-founded Apple Computer in 1976 and, with his childhood friend Steve Wozniak, marketed what was considered the world’s first personal computer, the Apple II.

Shortly after learning of Jobs’ death, Wozniak told ABC News, “I’m shocked and disturbed.”
Industry watchers called him a master innovator — perhaps on a par with Thomas Edison — changing the worlds of computing, recorded music and communications.

In 2004, he beat back an unusual form of pancreatic cancer, and in 2009 he was forced to get a liver transplant. After several years of failing health, Jobs announced on Aug. 24, 2011 that he was stepping down as Apple’s chief executive

“I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know,” Jobs wrote in his letter of resignation. “Unfortunately, that day has come.”

One of the world’s most famous CEOs, Jobs remained stubbornly private about his personal life, refusing interviews and shielding his wife and their children from public view.

“He’s never been a media person,” said industry analyst Tim Bajarin, president of Creative Strategies, after Jobs resigned. “He’s granted interviews in the context of product launches, when it benefits Apple, but you never see him talk about himself.”

The highlights of Jobs’s career trajectory are well-known: a prodigy who dropped out of Reed College in Oregon and, at 21, started Apple with Wozniak in his parents’ garage. He was a multimillionaire by 25, appeared on the cover of Time magazine at 26, and was ousted at Apple at age 30, in 1984.

In the years that followed, he went into other businesses, founding NeXT computers and, in 1986, buying the computer graphics arm of Lucasfilm, Ltd., which became Pixar Animation Studios.

He was described as an exacting and sometimes fearsome leader, ordering up and rejecting multiple versions of new products until the final version was just right. He said the design and aesthetics of a device were as important as the hardware and software inside.

In 1996, Apple, which had struggled without Jobs, brought him back by buying NeXT. He became CEO in 1997 and put the company on a remarkable upward path.

By 2001 the commercial music industry was on its knees because digital recordings, copied and shared online for free, made it unnecessary for millions of people to buy compact discs.

Jobs took advantage with the iPod — essentially a pocket-sized computer hard drive with elegantly simple controls and a set of white earbuds so that one could listen to the hours of music one saved on it. He set up the iTunes online music store, and persuaded major recording labels to sell songs for 99 cents each. No longer did people have to go out and buy a CD if they liked one song from it. They bought a digital file and stored it in their iPod.

In 2007, he transformed the cell phone. Apple’s iPhone, with its iconic touch screen, was a handheld computer, music player, messaging device, digital wallet and — almost incidentally — cell phone. Major competitors, such as BlackBerry, Nokia and Motorola, struggled after it appeared.

By 2010, Apple’s new iPad began to cannibalize its original business, the personal computer. The iPad was a sleek tablet computer with a touch screen and almost no physical buttons. It could be used for almost anything software designers could conceive, from watching movies to taking pictures to leafing through a virtual book.

Personal life

Jobs kept a close cadre of friends, Bajarin said, including John Lasseter of Pixar and Larry Ellison of Oracle, but beyond that, shared very little of his personal life with anyone.

But that personal life — he was given up at birth for adoption, had an illegitimate child, was romantically linked with movie stars — was full of intrigue for his fan base and Apple consumers.

Jobs and his wife, Laurene Powell, were married in a small ceremony in Yosemite National Park in 1991, lived in Woodside, Calif., and had three children: Reed Paul, Erin Sienna and Eve.

He admitted that when he was 23, he had a child out of wedlock with his high school girlfriend, Chris Ann Brennan. Their daughter, Lisa Brennan Jobs, was born in 1978.

He had a biological sister, Mona Simpson, the author of such well-known books as “Anywhere But Here.” But he did not meet Simpson until they were adults and he was seeking out his birth parents. Simpson later wrote a book based on their relationship. She called it “A Regular Guy.”

Fortune magazine reported that Jobs denied paternity of Lisa for years, at one point swearing in a court document that he was infertile and could not have children. According to the report, Chris Ann Brennan collected welfare for a time to support the child until Jobs later acknowledged Lisa as his daughter.
There were other personal details that emerged over the years, as well.

At Reed, Jobs became romantically involved with the singer Joan Baez, according to Elizabeth Holmes, a friend and classmate. In “The Second Coming of Steve Jobs,” Holmes tells biographer Alan Deutschman that Jobs broke up with his serious girlfriend to “begin an affair with the charismatic singer-activist.” Holmes confirmed the details to ABC News.

Jobs’ health and Apple’s health

Enigmatic and charismatic, Jobs said little about himself. But then his body began to fail him.
In 2004, he was forced to say publicly he had a rare form of pancreatic cancer. In 2009, it was revealed that he had quietly gone to a Memphis hospital for a liver transplant.

He took three medical leaves from Apple. He did not share details.

In 2009, sources said, members of Apple’s board of directors had to persuade him to disclose more about his health as “a fiduciary issue,” interwoven with the health of the company.

He was listed in March as 109th on the Forbes list of the world’s billionaires, with a net worth of about $8.3 billion. After selling Pixar animation studios to The Walt Disney Company in 2006, he became a Disney board member and the company’s largest shareholder. Disney is the parent company of ABC News.

Analysts said Apple performed well during Jobs’ absence, partly because he was available for big decisions and partly because his chief lieutenant, Tim Cook, was the hands-on manager even when Jobs was there.

The company has a history of bouncing back. In January 2009, after he announced his second medical leave, Apple stock dropped to $78.20 per share. But it quickly recovered and became one of the most successful stocks on Wall Street. On one day in the summer of 2011, with the stock hitting the $400 level, Apple briefly passed ExxonMobil as the world’s most valuable company.

By ferryjaolis